In a world in which each day, each week and each month has a specific cause, this one is barely a blip on the radar screen.

It’s not very famous. In a world in which each day, each week and each month has a specific cause, this one is barely a blip on the radar screen.

But, we do take note that this week marks the 75th anniversary of National Newspaper Week. In case you didn’t know — and we’re guessing that most of you didn’t — the week is designed to note the impact of newspapers in their communities.

This year’s theme — yes, we have one of those — is the “power of the press.”

It’s easy to look back in history and see examples of the “power of the press.” Perhaps one of the most famous is the Washington Post investigation into the Watergate break-ins that eventually led to President Richard Nixon’s resignation — and to every scandal since that time having the suffix “gate” attached to it, such as the New England Patriots football team’s “deflategate.”

But the “power of the press” is far from limited to such scandals. As a matter of fact, rarely are such scandals revealed in our pages.

Instead, the “power of the press” rests in stories such as the Havelock High School band’s participation in the National Memorial Day Parade. The story resonated with you, our readers, and thousands of dollars were raised to help the band make the trip and represent Havelock on the grandest of stages.

A couple of weeks ago, we featured the story of a 4-year-old boy with a seizure disorder and his family’s efforts to raise $4,000 to help with the purchase and training of a therapy dog. A fundraiser netted $2,800 toward that goal.

Just last week, our special pink edition brought attention to the Havelock Fire Department’s pink T-shirt fundraiser to support cancer patients, and we shared the stories of how those patients benefitted from those funds.

We didn’t cause a president to resign, but these examples highlight the “power of the press.” More importantly, they highlight you, our readers, because you got involved. We may tell the stories, but you take the action.

So in essence, National Newspaper Week isn’t just about us. It celebrates readers everywhere who make newspapers an essential part of their lives, and for that, we thank you.