Sophomore leads the Rams with nine goals this season

At 6 years old, Christian Hoomana told his mother that he wanted to play soccer.

He doesn’t regret that decision. The sophomore has turned into Havelock High’s primary scoring threat.

“It’s a big responsibility,” Hoomana said. “If we need that goal or that extra push, I have to be that guy that can get us that goal.”

Hoomana scored six goals as a freshman last season. Through 10 games this season, he has a team-high nine goals.

He netted three first-half goals in a 5-3 loss at Greenville Rose on Sept. 10 and scored twice in an 8-0 victory over West Craven last week.

“I just have to do my job and open things up for the other players,” he said. “I make my runs and they get it to me.”

Hoomana was born in Guam but moved to Havelock when he was 5 years old. The Rams’ striker continued to develop his play at Havelock Middle School before making the jump straight to the high school varsity level.

The biggest reason for his improvement, he said, is because of his teammates.

“I get the ball more,” he said. “Last year, we had skill on the team, but we didn’t have that connection to where we would pass the ball around. Here, we share the ball around. We defend as a team, move up as a team and play offense as a team.”

Hoomana is taking the sport seriously, and hopes to one day earn a college scholarship. But he still has two more years to improve his craft. He recently joined the 18-and-under youth team with the Havelock Youth Soccer Association.

“The expectations I have for myself are to not make stupid passes, just think before I pass. I hope to keep doing as good as I can,” he said. “I want to go to college and play soccer, so I just want to progress and do as good as I can.”

Havelock owns a 3-6-1 overall record and a 1-1 mark in conference play. The Rams travel to East Carteret on Tuesday and play host to West Carteret on Thursday.

Hoomana is one of three sophomores on a team of 12 seniors.

“Being an underclassman, I listen to the captains, then I will be like a secondary leader,” he said. “I talk them up and I help this team become better.

“I have a lot of confidence in my team. We have a lot of good players. The big thing is making sure we do the right thing on the field.”

Adam Thompson is the sports editor of the Sun Journal.