There is no easy way to write what I am about to write. So, I will rip the proverbial Band-Aid off quickly.

I am leaving the Havelock News, having accepted a position as the managing editor with The Globe, which is the military base paper at Camp Lejeune.

I know, I know. Technically, I sort of left the Havelock News in 2016 when my job description changed, and I was moved up to New Bern to help with the Sun Journal. During the past couple of years, I have tried to keep my hands in Havelock, writing the occasional story or taking a few pictures here and there. But most often I was assigning those duties out to others within our GateHouse Media family as schedules would allow.

I’m leaving you in the very capable hands of Tina Adkins. She’s been with the Sun Journal for years and will be handling all the community announcements and submitted items for the paper. She is also good for any story ideas you may have. She can be reached at tina.adkins@newbernsj.com or she can be called at 635-5681.

She will be relaying information to Chris Segal, the current editor of the Sun Journal, who will be assigning stories out in Havelock. He can be reached at chris.segal@newbernsj.com or at 635-5663.

And of course the general email box for the Havelock News is still active at havenews@havenews.com.

The reason for my departure to The Globe is pretty simple. I enjoy being around the military and appreciate what our service personnel do. I appreciate the opportunity to tell their stories. They have so many good ones, and to get the chance to get out and meet our service members and share their stories is a privilege.

When working with Drew C. Wilson at the Havelock News and Cherry Point Post, I regularly had that chance to do those things, but with the move to New Bern, my time spent in the pursuit of telling the military story has decreased as my role has changed — more planning and budgeting and less work writing stories and taking videos and pictures. Making the move to The Globe provides me the chance to share those stories again.

I’m from Havelock, the son of a Marine who retired from Cherry Point and then worked a civil service job. To have the chance to cover Havelock — my hometown — was truly a blessing.

I have some fond memories of the stories that I have covered, none bigger than when I had to chance to go on the Honor Flight in which World War II veterans were flown to Washington to view the memorial built in their honor. The opportunity to meet so many WWII vets who allowed me to share their stories will always be the best thing that I have ever done in journalism. I hope the coverage I provided was worthy of the honors they so richly deserve.

I also enjoyed covering school events around Havelock. As the husband of a teacher and the father of one too, I very much appreciate the effort that goes into that profession. I’ve seen the many late nights my family has put into education. There’s a passion there that I hope I was able to convey through my interviews with teachers.

And of course the students were joys as well. Whether it was an elementary student getting a free book as part of a reading program or a high school one graduating and moving on to life’s next adventure, I felt like I was learning right along with everyone.

And, you can’t talk Havelock without Havelock sports. I was on the sidelines for some state championship victories and some heartbreaking Havelock losses, and will carry those memories with me for a long time.

Really, what I’m trying to say here is thank you. You have no idea what it means to me to have you welcome me into your lives — if only briefly — so I can share your story with the readers of this paper.

And that’s what journalism is all about. It’s not about the reporter. It’s about you. You make the journalism. A reporter doesn’t. It’s your newspaper, not the reporter’s or the editor’s or even the company that owns it.

You have wonderful stories to share, and I’m very thankful that you allowed me to share them.